Saturday, March 2, 2013

Surviving an Earthquake

Somebody asked me if--living in California and all--I've ever experienced an earthquake. Let's think about that a minute. California. Earthquake. Hmmmm . . . That would be a "yes," I have. *scary*
Earthquakes are not just a "new California" happening. Check out this link and scroll down to see a list of the history of earthquakes in California. Either they didn't keep very good track back in the 1800s or . . . the number of earthquakes in the state are going up, up, up in modern times.  Not a cheery thought.

I have to confess that I don't like earthquakes at all (I even like thunderstorms better). I felt a few little shakes last year. The chandelier swayed, the dishes rattled, and I dived under the table quick as a jackrabbit! Chad laughed his head off. He said that wasn't anything. Before that, the year I turned ten, I was staying with Aunt Rebecca in San Francisco (because of a scarlet fever epidemic in the valley) and I experienced a "little" earthquake. Not much too them, but they sure do rattle your nerves!

Chad doesn't think I don't remember my very first earthquake. (He is so wrong!) I was not quite four years old, but I remember it just as clearly as if it happened yesterday. It was back in 1872, March 26, to be exact. The center of that earthquake was up in Lone Pine. You can read about it here: Lone Pine Earthquake. It was a little town about 80 miles east of our ranch, up in the Sierras. The whole town was flattened and people were killed. And everybody in California felt that thing . . . me included.

The awful trembling woke me up in the middle of the night. At the time, I didn't have my own room. I slept with Melinda, thank goodness! It was dark, and I was asleep. Suddenly, a big trembling and shaking woke me up. The whole bed was rattling . . . no . . . rolling like I was in a boat. The glass lamps crashed to the floor. Everything on our shelves--books, toys, games--crashed to the floor.

I started screaming, so Melinda grabbed my hand and hauled me--screaming--to Mother and Father. Father caught me up and hugged me tight, then we all got out of there. I guess Father thought it was safer to be outside in the wide, open yard, where nothing could fall on us. The stairs were swaying and the hanging chandelier fell, just missing Mitch and breaking all over the floor.

By the time we got outside, the shaking had stopped. But my crying didn't. I wouldn't let Father put me down the rest of the night. And a good thing too! Because something called "aftershocks" kept happening. It was cold outside, but we all huddled together until the worst of it was over. Then Father sent Justin inside to fetch some blankets.
Mother and Father went up to see the damage.

For the next few weeks, everybody on the ranch spent the days cleaning up the mess. Our house had a lot of damage. It was stucco (adobe), and those kind of buildings fare worse than buildings like the barn, which are made of wood. Wooden buildings just "go with the flow" in an earthquake.  

If I live to be 100, I don't ever want to experience an earthquake like that again.

Note: Andi experienced yet another quake. In 1906, when she was 38, she was visiting San Francisco, and what do you know? She was caught right in the middle of one of the worse earthquakes in California history! (And yes, I'm making all this up, dear readers. Remember, Andi is a character from a books series!)  SAN FRANCISCO EARTHQUAKE


Extra note: But I'm not making this next part up. Mrs. M has experienced her own share of earthquakes in Washington state. She was in the fourth grade when a big earthquake just before school. The floor rolled and the hanging lamp swayed! Her most recent earthquake was in 2000, around lunchtime. The chandelier swayed back and forth, and she went outside with her children to see what it looked like. The cars bounced in the driveway and the telephone poles swayed back and forth. It was creepy. And just last year, she was awakened one morning to a small earthquake, which rumbled the cabin where she lives. 


 

22 comments:

  1. Thanks for the answer! I love it that you can learn from this blog about history as well as have a lot of fun!
    God bless and keep you ever!
    Indi

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  2. If Andi was in the 1906 earthquake, did she get severely injured? The whole city was literally burnt to the ground from all the pipes breaking up and poring out its contents everywhere... so that is why I am just wondering if she got hurt from either the fires or the earthquake :)

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    1. Andi was helping out at the Presbyterian Mission Home that week, so she and Ms. Donaldina Cameron (a real person who ran the home. The earthquake was at 5am and Andi and Ms. Cameron were already up and about. So they were able to keep themselves and the little children from being hurt by the falling debris. They were quickly evacuated and managed to make their way to the ferry and go across the Bay to Oakland.

      I have a picture of the real Mission Home after the earthquake and fire, and it is a burned out shell! They rebuilt and continued to carry out their mission to help the young Chinese girls and women who were suffering from slavery and abuse.

      All that above is true except for the part I made up about Andi, since she's not a real person (I like to remind you readers of that occasionally!). See Andrea Carter and the San Francisco Smugglers story to learn all about the mission home and the little Chinese girls.

      Hope that answered your question!

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  3. Do you have running water in you house?? or do you have to get it from the stream??

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    1. We have a kitchen pump, that brings water in from the well. We even have a wash room upstairs, but it's not like modern wash rooms. But there is a bathtub in there, on legs that look like lion paws. :-) And there is a drain for the water to go down. Don't ask me how that works!

      I heard rumors that we may even try one of those new-fangled things called toilets that flush! They use gravity!

      There are no streams on our ranch unless you go up to my special creek up in the hills. There are irrigation ditches though, to bring water from the river to the orchards. Yep! Things are getting mighty modern these days in 1880!

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  4. Have you ever met Annie Oakley, Andi??? Mitch and you talked about her in Trouble with Treasure.

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    1. Sadly, no. *sigh* Ever since Mitch talked about her, though, I really want to meet her and her sharpshooting husband, Frank Butler. If their trick shooting show comes to town, I will definitely write about it. :-)

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  5. Mrs. Marlow, since the poll for the paper dolls had a majority of the vote that said "yes", are you going to make the paper dolls now?

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    1. I will email my illustrator and see what kind of timeline she's on, so the answer is "yes," I'll start the process. But it might take a number of months. Her daughter is having a baby, so obviously creating paper dolls are probably not on her #1 list of things to think about. But she already said she was open to it! :-)

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  6. Hey Andi are you ever going to more books to the circle c?




    this is a different person

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    1. I would like to have more, but that is up to my publisher. Maybe when I finish the Goldtown series, I could ask and see. I have a few more stories on my computer! :-)

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    2. Andi: When ever any one asks you about making paper dolls or more books or something (etc.)
      Why do you always have to say I will ask my publisher. Does she write the books or what?
      Not trying to be rude! Just Wondering!

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  7. GREAT question, Beth. No, I write the books, for sure. But my publisher, Kregel, PUBLISHES the books. If they don't want one that I have written, then it won't get published. So I have to find out if they will publish the next one. You see, I don't have to pay anything to publish my books. Kregel Publications does that. They take all the risks, they market the books, make sure they are in the bookstores, and all that stuff. And they pay ME a % of the sales. That's how "real" publishers work.

    My contract says they own the "marketing" rights, like audio books, etc. But they gave me back my marketing rights for the paper dolls and also gave me ALL electronic rights back, so I can make audio books myself and SELL them myself. Contracts are tricky things. For instance, if anybody wanted to make movies out of my books, the publisher would have to say YES, and they would get a lot of money from that. I would get a little. Not much.

    My publisher has a lot of people working for them: editors (who help the book look good for the final), the cover designer, the marketing and sales and publicity. It is a company.

    Sure, I can write whatever I want, but if they don't want to add books to the series, then I would have to find another publisher or print them myself.

    Does that make sense? It's like . . . I work for them as an author. I can always find another publisher, but I really, really like Kregel. They are a Christian publisher and have been around for a long, long time. They pretty much like whatever I offer them. But I was told that the Circle C books were "finished." BUT, in the publishing world, things could always change. That's why I say I need to ask them--mostly for counsel and to see if they are interested in taking on the projects.


    thanks for the great question and ask another if you want!
    ~Susan (for Andi)

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  8. Hey Andi, Do you have any other Animals besides Horses? Like any Chickens or Ducks?

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    1. Oh, yes! I will write a post about them and include pictures. Give me a week or so . . . :-)

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  9. Dear Andi,
    At the end of Dangerous Decision, what did you do with that snake?!
    Ira-Grace

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    1. Good question, Ira-Grace. I will have to flip through my Journal and see if I remember what I did with that little snake! My mind was still a bit foggy, recovering from the gunshot wound, but I think I have it somewhere. I'll write about it . . .

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  10. So is Andi really 38 years old now?

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  11. Well, Izzy, if you imagine yourself back in 1881 when you read these posts (like I do when I write them), then no, Andi is still 13. :-)
    But if you are going by real dates (like the 1906 earthquake), then she's 145 years old, since it is now 2013. Scary thought!

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  12. My mom said there was an earth quake were we lived. It was about 2:00 in the morning when it started shaking. But it was sooo light..... I slept through the whole thing:-D

    Allison

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  13. Wow! What a story!!! That sounds really scary. There was an earthquake at our old house, but I don'r remember it. Thank goodness. Also, it was kind of sad to hear about your Father....

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  14. Hi n salam

    My name is Mohammed Adnan. These days I am writing stories and articles about the experiences of people who explore different place in the world. We feature these stories or articles in our website preacquaint.com. People share with us the interesting, courageous, adventurous, and unforgettable experiences of visiting some beautiful places.

    In this regard I would like to send you an interview questionnaire consisting of simple questions. Once you send and fill that questionnaire, I will write a story about your survival from earthquake and will feature on preacquaint.com. So I need your permission to send to the said questionnaire.

    Thanks and Regards
    Mohammed Adnan

    ReplyDelete

Let Andi know what you think!